Conyngs in Greke Wine

Conyngs in Greke Wine

Conyng is an Old English world meaning coney or rabbit, and this dish has existed in our land since at least the fourteenth century. Indeed, this dish was one of the main courses at the coronation of Henry IV in 1399. Excellent served with rice for 4 people.

  • 1 rabbit, portioned
  • olive oil
  • 3 tbsps red wine vinegar
  • For the marinade:
  • 170g (6 oz) Muscatel raisins (seedless)
  • 170g (6 oz) dried apricots
  • 3 large pieces ginger, sliced
  • 1 tbsp syrup from the stem ginger
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground cloves
  • 12 juniper berries (optional)
  • 250ml (½ pint) sweet Greek red wine or white wine
  • Seasoned flour (vary according to what you have):
  • 150 (5 oz) flour
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • ½ tbsp celery salt
  • ½ tbsp pepper
  • 1 tbsp dry mustard
  • 2 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • ¼ tsp thyme
  • ¼ tsp sweet basil
  • ¼ tsp oregano
  1. Put all the ingredients for the marinade in a large bowl, cover and leave overnight to blend. The next day, arrange the rabbit portions on a dish and pour over the marinated fruit and wine. Leave for at least 5 or 6 hours, then remove the rabbit portions and dry them.
  2. Coat the pieces in the seasoned flour and fry until golden in gently smoking oil. Drain off excess oil. Pour over the fruit marinade, and cover and simmer for 30-40 minutes, or until the largest parts are tender (the back fillets will be cooked first).
  3. Remove the rabbit pieces and keep warm while you reduce the sauce until thick and cohered, by boiling rapidly for 10-15 minutes, then recombine and serve.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *